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PostPosted: Thu March 7th, 2019, 14:23 GMT 

Joined: Mon June 20th, 2016, 20:37 GMT
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I've been looking forward to this ever since it was first announced. I've worked in music archives, so any peek I can get into what's in Tulsa, I'm jumping at. They don't have too much announced yet, but this is their first try at this. I'm certain it will be interesting. And yes, the Woody Guthrie center will be worth checking out.

Steve


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PostPosted: Fri March 8th, 2019, 08:32 GMT 

Joined: Sun November 16th, 2014, 01:17 GMT
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This is an insanely long post, but for those who know very little about Tulsa, it might be worth reading.

I knew next to nothing about Tulsa until fairly recently. That great tune "Tulsa Time" by the late Don Williams--covered by Clapton--is about it, truth be told. I've since found out a few things.

This Land Press, a former magazine/broadsheet published from 2010 to around 2017, was (and might still be) a pretty innovative publication out of Tulsa that covered America's middle or heartland with the depth and length of pieces from, say, The New Yorker. This Land has a web site that sells their back issues and all kinds of oddball stuff. Homemade crafts, Woody Guthrie-related items, socially conscious who-knows-what. One article from their magazine about a supposed connection between John Lennon and Oral Roberts was mind-bending. Really a great piece of reporting by some woman whose name I'm now unfortunately forgetting.

Oh, and Oral Roberts University is in Tulsa. For those that don't know, Roberts was a famous TV preacher who's since passed away. I'm thinking the campus was founded in the '60s or '70s but I wouldn't swear to it. Somebody told me their campus is like stepping back into a different era, like the era when The Jetsons TV show was on the air. I had no idea, but then stepped on their campus--and holy man--the architecture was a transport back to some forlorn decade. Maybe somebody might say something about their theology, but I'll just say some of their buildings need an upgrade.

Anyway, This Land Press put out a couple of reader books that collected their top shelf magazine stuff, one about race and one about religion. From what I can tell, they were not playing around. The term "cutting edge" has become a cliche, but it seems that describes what they were up to in the journalism and literary world. This guy, Lee Roy (can't remember now his last name) who fairly recently passed away--he was only in his 40s--was a Tulsa historian and freelance writer/investigative reporter who was turning over rocks in Tulsa and making the city fathers nervous. One of This Land's radio guys was ready to sleep in a tent to do work for them and he wound up getting hired. The guy who founded This Land Press had a book out about a decade ago entitled Head Cases about brain injuries (published by Farrar & Giroux), and one of the reasons the magazine is no longer running is that he returned to the healthcare industry.

Also, we can pretty much thank Tulsa for "Watching the River Flow," the city is written all over that song with the musicians and the sound. Jim Keltner's a Tulsa native. Now there's a drummer with a long history with Dylan, dating back, I think, to that "Watching the River Flow" session.

Tulsa native George Kaiser, the gentleman who procured the Dylan Archive (in tandem with the University of Tulsa), sounds like an intriguing figure. I've read about all the money he's poured into his home state and city, working on issues like poverty and education. The guy seems to have a lot of heart and soul. The Dylan Archive, at that reported 15-20 million dollars, is peanuts to Kaiser, or any billionaire, I guess. Kaiser's dad was a judge who was exiled from Nazi Germany in 1935. He was born in '42, and remembers taking in Joan Baez concerts in Boston when he was a student at Harvard.

Believe it or not, Tulsa has a history with the Irish mob. Although not the Irish mob, if I'm not mistaken, a death decades ago in Tulsa was attributed to James "Whitey" Bulger, the mobster who very recently met a grisly fate in his old age when transferred to a federal prison in West Virginia. In his wheelchair, some fellow inmates caught up with him and he was in the hereafter before even spending a few nights in the new prison that was going to be his home.

Tulsa has this legendary Church Studio that the late Leon Russell had from either the late '60s or early '70s. Among many other things, it was a HUGE part of the beginnings of what became a certain band: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers. Steve Ripley bought the Church Studio in the late '80s and owned it until 2006. Even though born in Idaho, Ripley was a hard-core Tulsa fixture for much of his life. He was in Dylan's band in '81 (and helped out on the Shot of Love album), was onstage with Dylan again in '90 and '91, guesting as a guitarist in Tulsa. He and Dylan met up again in Tulsa, in either '08 or '09, for a brief backstage chat. This was in the same time frame when Dylan was asked in a Rolling Stone interview about which guitarists really stood out to him that he's played with. Ripley was one of the guys Dylan mentioned. (Michael Bloomfield--in a big way--was also mentioned, along with Freddy Tackett and Mick Taylor.) In 2016, Ripley was called on to assemble this Dylan tribute at Tulsa's Cain's Ballroom once the Dylan Archive had just begun arriving. This gig, I found out, was put on by the George Kaiser folks and approved by the Dylan camp (or else Ripley would not have been out of his farm and into the city as the concert's curator). Ripley just passed away this January at age 69.

Tulsa is seemingly out in the middle of nowhere when you're traveling down whatever highway it is. But the city itself suddenly appears and once you drive around in it, and walk around a bit, the arts community, the restaurants, and bars reveal that's something's cooking in Tulsa, including the Dylan Archive.


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PostPosted: Fri March 8th, 2019, 13:32 GMT 
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Yup, Tulsa is certainly for the hard cores.

Tulsa is associated with a treasure-trove of talented musicians.
As mentioned, Leon Russell played a huge role in making Tulsa musically cool.
Many of Tulsa's musicians were Leon’s friends, even schoolmates. Among them: J. J. Cale, Jim Keltner, Carl Radle, Elvin Bishop, Jamie Oldaker, Roy Clark. Not to mention the countless musicians who spent time there, or passed through. The musical ties are endless and hopefully the Tulsa music scene is still cranking.

Definitely seems like more of a draw than Buddy Holly’s Lubbock, right? Ha ha.


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PostPosted: Sun March 10th, 2019, 00:28 GMT 

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I'm clueless on Lubbock. Didn't know that is where Holly was from--I take it the town hasn't properly acknowledged their native son?


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PostPosted: Sun March 10th, 2019, 15:22 GMT 

Joined: Mon June 20th, 2016, 20:37 GMT
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cloudofwit wrote:
I'm clueless on Lubbock. Didn't know that is where Holly was from--I take it the town hasn't properly acknowledged their native son?

Well, they do have the Buddy Holly Center (on Crickets Avenue yet!). Lubbock is a small town, but over the years they have given Holly his due. I think it did take awhile though.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddy_Holly_Center

Steve


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PostPosted: Tue March 12th, 2019, 20:37 GMT 
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Dylan world -

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6795861/Folk-legend-Bob-Dylan-77-makes-youthful-updates-Malibu-compound.html


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PostPosted: Sat March 16th, 2019, 01:01 GMT 
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Don’t Start Me Talkin’
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=YdvXC8tWqZk
Last chance for Early Bird registration.


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PostPosted: Tue March 19th, 2019, 16:06 GMT 
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The program is now online: https://dylan.utulsa.edu/world-bob-dyla ... program-2/


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PostPosted: Wed March 20th, 2019, 09:38 GMT 
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My paper was selected but I could not accept the invitation because of the very high price. As of now, even though already graduated, I am still a university student, but I am an independent researcher and the costs were really expensive considering that I live and study in Italy. Even as a relator, I should have also paid the entrance... What a pity. Let us hope they will organise debates like those in Europe soon! My researches about Bob are several and, I think, very interesting.

Samu


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PostPosted: Wed March 20th, 2019, 12:05 GMT 
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Thursday Program
Thursday May 30


11:00 Registration Opens in Hyatt Lobby

SESSION A:1:00-2:30
A1: DYLAN AT WORK
Susan Scarberry-Garcia, On a Trail of Bells: Bob Dylan’s Oracular Song
Jeffrey S. Roessner, Meet Me at the Border: Bob Dylan’s Poetics of Excess
Paul Haney, Demystifying Genius: Employing Dylan’s Writing Techniques

A2: DYLAN AND ROMANTICISM
Sasha Tamar Strelitz, Who Prophesizes With His Pen
Matthew Borushko, Dylan and Shelley
Peter Hammond, Emerson and Dylan

A3: MAKING OLD SONGS NEW
Steven Rings, What Did You Hear, My Blue-Eyed Son?; Or, the Musical Sources for “Hard Rain” (and Why “Lord Randal” Isn’t Among Them)
Malcolm Barr-Hamilton, “This is a Real Old Song”: Dylan and Barbara Allen
Flemming G. Andersen, From “Gypsy Davey” via “Blackjack Davey” to “Tin Angel”

A4: CARNIVAL OF CHARACTERS
Erin Callahan, The Madwomen in the Basement
Nina Goss, Madness in Great Ones: In Which the Strange Parade of Street-Legal Radicalizes the Poetic Ideal of Negative Capability
Sara Martinez, A Multifaceted Masculinity: “The Road” in the Making of Bob Dylan (1962-66)
Jim Salvucci, (chair) “’But now destiny was about to manifest itself’: The Manifest Destiny of Bob Dylan’s Carnival of Character(s).”

3:00-3:30 Coffee Break

SESSION B: 3:30-5:00
B1: TEACHING ROUNDTABLE
Anne Margaret Daniel (Participants TBD)

B2: MAKING IT NEW AGAIN: DYLAN & MODERNISM
Christopher Mitchell, Thunder Rolled by the Rolling Stars: “Desolation Row” and The Waste Land
Shawn Holliday, “Make it New!” Bob Dylan’s Embodiment of Ezra Pound’s Modern Artistic Aesthetic
Michael Thomas, American Poetry and the Art of Confession: Dylan, Lowell & Bishop

B3: DYLAN IN THE 21ST CENTURY
Matthew Lipson, “My Bell Still Rings:” Advancing Age, Intentionality, And Bob Dylan’s Vocal Archivism
Robert W. Kvalvaag, From «Tempest» to The Tempest
Andrew Muir, In the True Performing of It

B4: ENGLAND CALLING I
John Covach, ‘I Can’t Hide’: Bob Dylan and the British Invasion
David Thurmaier, The Collaborative and Collegial Relationship between Bob Dylan and George Harrison, 1968-70
Ken Womack, Dylan and the Beatles
 
5:15 SESSION C: WELCOME AND GREIL MARCUS KEYNOTE LECTURE
“Bob Dylan and the Blues”
 
7:00 OPENING RECEPTION (Tulsa: A Music City)

https://dylan.utulsa.edu/thursday-program/
 


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PostPosted: Wed March 20th, 2019, 12:07 GMT 
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Friday Program
Friday May 31


8:30 Registration Opens at Gilcrease
Free Bus Service To Gilcrease Begins

SESSION D: 9:30-11:00 
D1: ENGLAND CALLING II
Glenn Gass, The Beatles and Bob Dylan
John Hughes, “Liverpool Gal,” Pauline Boty, and Dylan’s first London Visit
Keith Miles, The Unknown Muse- Robert Graves and the Tregunter Road Encounter

D2: DYLAN IN THE WORLD: TRANSLATION AND TRANSMISSION
Scott M. Marshall, Mixed-Up Confusion: Bob Dylan’s Marathon Dance with the Media
Teng Jimeng, Found in Translation: How Dylan Shapes Our Lives and Transforms Our World
Layne M. Farmen “When I Edit My Masterpiece”: Bob Dylan, Terrence Malick, and “Creating Selfishly”

D3: TAKING IT ALL IN: LOOKING ACROSS DYLAN’S FULL CAREER
Barton Price, Bob Dylan’s Prophetic Voices
John Frank, All the Animals: The Animot in the World of Bob Dylan
Carolyn Johnston, Bob Dylan’s Odyssey

D4: OUT OF THE ARCHIVE: INFIDELS
Paul Yoder, “Jokerman” at the Ritz: Bob Dylan, Alexander Pope, and the Revision of “Jokerman”
Terry Gans, From “Too Late” to “Foot of Pride:” A Song’s Evolution and Abandonment
Walter Raubicheck, Man of the Mountains: “Jokerman” Reflects on “Dylan”

11:00-11:30 Coffee Break
SESSION E: 11:30-1:00 
E1: ARCHIVE KEYNOTE I
Michael Chaiken

E2: JUSTICE
Krystal Reyes, What Can Dylan’s Art Teach Us About Grief and Loss?
J. Matthew Martin, “False-hearted Judges:” the Judiciary of Bob Dylan
George Dunn, “Bury the Rag Deep in Your Face”: Retributive Justice in the Songs of Bob Dylan

E3: TWISTED TRUTH: DYLAN’S 60’S ROCK
Sarah Gates, “The Truth Just Twists”: Psychedelic Irony in Bob Dylan’s “Gates of Eden”
Quentin Miller, “It’s Chicken!”: Dylan’s Comic Absurdity and the Beat Generation
Christine Hand Jones, Bringing it All Back Home and Dylan’s Postmodern Apocalypse

E4: DYLAN AND THE AMERICAN WEST
Jim O’Brien, ‘Tales of Yankee Power’ Bob Dylan, The American West and the Politics of Cultural Identity
Leighton Grist, “‘I’m In a Cowboy Band’: Bob Dylan and the Western”
Cliff Fell, Singin’ the Muse: Bob Dylan, Robert Graves and the renewal of the Triple Moon Goddess Within Traditions of the American West

1:00 Lunch Break (Ticketed Lunch Available)

SESSION F: 2:00-3:30 
ARCHIVE KEYNOTE II
Michael Chaiken

F1: JUDGING AN UNJUST WORLD: THE LATE 60’S
Jeff Fallis, “Another Country: James Baldwin, Bob Dylan, and the 1960s”
Court Carney, “Alive as You or Me:” Bob Dylan’s Woody Guthrie
Michael Kramer, “A Time They Talk About”: John Wesley Harding and the Sixties Counterculture

F2: GOING BACK TO ROME: DYLAN AND ITALY
Mario Gerolamo Mossa (chair)
Giulio Pantalei, An Alternative Canon of Italian Literature: From Dante to Machiavelli Through the Lens of Dylan
Fabio Fantuzzi, Bob Dylan’s Boot: Italy in the Lyrics of the Bard

F3: DYLAN IN THE 21ST CENTURY II
Thomas Wilmeth, “Reflections on a Soldier’s Grave”
Steven Thwaits, “Dylan: 21st Century Performing Artist”
Isaac Slone, “Bobcats: an Exploratory Analysis of Contemporary Dylan Fandom on the Fan Site ‘Bob Links’”

F4: THE TRICKSTER: BOB DYLAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN TRICKSTER TRADITIONS
Terry Pace, Transformative Themes in both Bob Dylan’s Work and Native American Tricksters
Rockey Robbins, Imploding American Mythology and Colonialism: Comparison between Dylan’s Album John Wesley Harding and Cherokee Rabbit Trickster Tales
Jesse (Red Eagle) Robbins, The Trickster in Dylan’s Work and Indigenous Songs (Hip Hop and Hand Drum)

3:30-4:00 Coffee Break

SESSION G: 4:00-5:30
G1: ACROSS THE CURRICULUM
Mick Cochrane, “Hey, Bob Dylan, We Wrote You A Poem:” Dylan’s Songs in the Creative Writing Workshop
Joyce C. Smith, Bob Dylan: An Undergraduate Seminar on Dylan’s Lyrics as Poetry
Michael Nadler, The Lyricism of Bob Dylan in the Context of Civilization and History: A Presentation for Educators

G2: LOOKING BACK: DYLAN ON FILM
Michael Hacker, Bob Dylan, Filmmaker: “The Movie’ll Be Like A Song, Really”
Jonathan Hodgers, ‘Bob Dylan: Auteur’
Carlos Reviriego, “Godardylanology:” Life and Art of Two Genius’s Through the Looking Glass–Jean-Luc Godard the Poet and Bob Dylan the Filmmaker.

G3: DYLAN AT WORK: IN THE STUDIO
Rob Hurd, “Basement Noise”: Audience, Technology, and Value in Dylan Bootlegs
Christopher Rollason, Dylan the Writer at Work: on the Multiple Versions of ‘Dignity’ and the Two Versions of ‘Ain’t Talkin”
Daryl Sanders, Why Blonde on Blonde Could Have Only Been Recorded in Nashville

G4: LIVING WELL: DYLAN’S ETHICAL HUMANISM
Lisa O’Neill Sanders, “Dylan’s Treatment of Justice, Injustice, Conscience, Crime and Law”
Graley Herren, “Young Goodman Dylan: Chronicles at the Crossroads”
Robert Reginio, “Searching for ‘Dignity:’ Various Versions of a Prophetic Calling”
Raphael Falco (chair/respondent)

G5: ROOTS AND DEBTS
TBD
Gayle Wald, Bob Dylan and the Gospel Chanteuse
Harold Lepidus, Bob Dylan, Street Legal, and the ghost of Elvis


5:30 Bus Service to Hyatt Begins

8:00pm
KEYNOTE EVENT SPONSORED BY THE BOB DYLAN CENTER

https://dylan.utulsa.edu/friday-program/


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PostPosted: Wed March 20th, 2019, 12:09 GMT 
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Saturday Program
Saturday June 1


Hyatt

SESSION H: 9:30-11:00
H1: OUT OF THE ARCHIVE II
Larry Starr, Bob Dylan’s Essential Harmonica
Betsy Bowden, “A Poem Ain’t a Song / Nyanh, a Poem Ain’t a Song / The Time Is Ripe to Right that Wrong”
Richard F. Thomas, “Too Serious to Fool”

H2: VISUAL ART
Anne-Marie Mai, The Melancholy of Bob Dylan’s Songs and Paintings
Fabio Fantuzzi, Ut Pictura “Poiesis” Bob Dylan and Painting
Bob Keyes, Bob Dylan’s Visual Language

H3: MUSICAL ACTIVISM
Call Cameron, “No Nukes”
Richard Lee, Bob Dylan, Citizen Journalist: Exploring “The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll”
Michael Perlin, “You That Build the Death Planes”: Bob Dylan, War and International Affairs

H4: STARDOM: CELEBRITY, FANS, AND COVERS
David Shumway, Dylan on Celebrity and Identity
James Adams, “Get in on the Action and Scribble” – The Fugitive World of Bob Dylan Fanzines
Debra Rae Cohen, “Any Bob Dylan Song”

11:00-11:30 Coffee Break

11:30-1:00
ANN POWERS KEYNOTE
 
1:00 Lunch

SESSION I: 2:00-3:30
I1: GOTTA SERVE SOMEBODY I
Len Cazaly, “May Your Song Always Be Sung:” Bob Dylan, Modern Day Psalmist
Jonathan Verbeten, “Bob Dylan’s God-Awful Gospel”: Keith Green and the “Jesus Phase”
Jeffrey S. Lamp, “’When He Returns’”: An Investigation of the Theological Influences on Bob Dylan’s Eschatology”

I2: POLITICS AND FANDOM: ON BEING EXCLUDED
Nicolette Rohr, “Them Screamin Girls”: Folk, Rock, and Dylan Fandom
Laura Tenschert, “What’s a Sweetheart Like You Doing In A Dump Like This?”
Antonio de Velasco, Nature, Solidarity and Change: “Chimes of Freedom” at the first Clinton Inaugural

I3: DYLAN AT WORK: ON THE PAGE
Mario Gerolamo Mossa, The Unpublished Autographs of “Like a Rolling Stone:” a New Insight into Dylan’s Vocal Composition of “Three-Dimensional Songs” Crossing Orality, Musicology and Textual Criticism
Gisle Selnes, Dylan’s Dummy Lyrics
Marc Mamigonian, Don’t Steal, Don’t Lift: James Joyce and Bob Dylan, Borrowing and “Stolentelling”

I4: THE LITERATURE OF LYRICS AND LINER NOTES
David Brackett, Bob Dylan’s Eat the Document and the Limits of Mass Cult Modernism
Dustin Lowman, IlLiterature for the Literate: The Social Conditions Motivating Bob Dylan’s Inverted Folk
Loren Glass, Literary Liner Notes

3:30-4:00 Coffee Break

SESSION J: 4:00-5:30
J1: DYLAN AT WORK: BLOOD ON THE TRACKS
Anne Margaret Daniel, Blood on the Tracks: The Notebooks and Drafts
Kevin Dettmar, Dylan, Plagiarized Emotion, and the Phrasal Imagination
Anastasia Karel, Tangled Up in the Tracks

J2: IF YOU CANNOT BRING GOOD NEWS: CONTINUOUS ENGAGEMENT AMID APPREHENSION IN DYLAN’S RESPONSES TO SOCIAL INJUSTICE
Taigen Dan Leighton, “Cruel Weapons on the Shelf: Continuing Expressions of Protest”
Steven Heine, “When Your Train Gets Lost: Explaining Dylan’s Reluctant Prophetic Voice”
Brook Ziporyn, “Prob’ly Take It to The Pawn Shop: Dylan Contra Dylan and the Beauty of Self-Hatred”
Preston Keido Houser, “Thunder at the Well: Yin-Yang Equilibriums in Dylan’s Social Responses”

J3: MYSTERIES OF MEANING
Toby A. Daspit, Why Bob Dylan Matters to 21st Century, and Beyond: An Exploration of Dylan’s Postmodern/Posthuman Educational Philosophies
Tanzil Chowdhury, Dylan through Derrida: The Secret in the Songs of Bob Dylan
Glenn Hughes, Bob Dylan’s Evocations of Mystery

J4: TEACHING ROUNDTABLE II
David Gaines
Nina Goss
Craig Hattam
Kathleen Hudson
Thomas Palaima

5:30 Dinner Break

8:00pm
KEYNOTE CONCERT AND CONVERSATION

https://dylan.utulsa.edu/saturday-program/


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PostPosted: Wed March 20th, 2019, 12:10 GMT 
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Sunday Program
Sunday June 2


Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame

9:00 Free Continental Breakfast
SESSION M: 9:30-11:00
M1: BEING FREE: FAREWELLS TO THE FOLK MOVEMENT
Mark Perry, Bob Dylan and the Polemics of the 1965 Newport Folk Festival
Alan Thomas, Another Side of Bob Dylan: Ground-Breaking or Transition?
Lee Barich, Visions of Ginsberg: Bob Dylan the History of the Beat Generation

M2: IT ALL STARTS WITH THE BLUES
Salvatore J. Fallica, Early Dylan: The Contemporary Anachronism
Robert H. Cataliotti, “Blind Boy Grunt: Bob Dylan in the 1960s Blues Revival”
Pete Dale, Adam Fairhall, A Hipster Sneer: Dylan’s Re-Coding of the Blue Third

M3: GOTTA SERVE SOMEBODY II
Erica Argyropoulos, “Exiled Man”: Bob Dylan’s Complicated Relationship with American Jewishness
Chris LeDrew, “Scriptural Symbolism: Bob Dylan’s Blonde on Blonde.”
Scott Peeples, “His Masquerade”: Dylan and Melville’s “The Confidence-Man”

M4: POETS AND PROFESSORS
Alan Davis, “Ain’t It Just Like Bob to Play Tricks When We’re Trying to Be So Quixotic?”
David Gaines, “‘Why Bob?’ in 157 Words/19 Lines/3 Stanzas”
Debra Marquart, “Searching for Dylan in Fargo”
Thom Tammaro, “Heart to Heart: Conversations with Bob Dylan”

11:00-11:30 Coffee Break

SESSION N:11:30-1:00
N1: THE GREAT AMERICAN SONGBOOK
Joe Hardin, Dylan as Master of the American Songbook: an Informal Catalog and Analysis
Jaime Carini, (Un)covering Triplicate: the World of Bob Dylan’s Great American Songbook Recordings
Stewart Habig, Dylan, Jazz, and Playing Out of his Mind

N2: RELIGION, SPIRITUALITY, AND BOB DYLAN
Malcolm Gold, “The Ghost of ’Lectricity”: Dylan Concerts as Religious Ritual
John Haas, “Apocalyptic Fables and ‘Sentimental Terror’: A Reading of Under the Red Sky”
Jay Case, “Old Religion During the Age of Aquarius: Dylan and John Wesley Harding.”
William Svelmoe (chair)

N3: DYLAN AND PHILOSOPHY
John Cusatis, “Busy Being Born:” Bob Dylan as the Embodiment of 20th Century Existentialism
Alejandro Rodriguez de Jesus, “Bob Dylan: Champion of the Outcasts”
Michael Chiarello, Bob Dylan’s Gentle Agnosticism: “Every Grain of Sand” and the Defense of Objective Truth.

N4: BLOOD ON THE TRACKS THROUGH THE LENS OF THE LIBERAL ARTS: INTERDISCIPLINARY EXPLORATIONS OF CONSCIOUSNESS AND AUTHENTICITY IN BOB DYLAN’S ARTISTIC PROCESS
Skip Dine Young, Making the Conscious Unconscious: The Inversion of the Psychoanalytic Method in Bob Dylan’s Artistic Process
Don Carrell, Heideggerian Insights into Bob Dylan’s “Up to Me”: Original Truths that the Artist Chose to Bury
Bill Bettler, Symbolic Convergence in Blood on the Tracks: A Deeply Personal Expression of Love and Loss—Or Not?

https://dylan.utulsa.edu/sunday-program/


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PostPosted: Wed March 20th, 2019, 13:43 GMT 
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The coffee breaks look good.


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PostPosted: Wed March 20th, 2019, 13:47 GMT 
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Bennyboy should pitch up across the street and hold his Alternative Bob Dylan Conference.


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PostPosted: Wed March 20th, 2019, 16:12 GMT 

Joined: Mon March 7th, 2011, 21:11 GMT
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samu_93 wrote:
My paper was selected but I could not accept the invitation because of the very high price. As of now, even though already graduated, I am still a university student, but I am an independent researcher and the costs were really expensive considering that I live and study in Italy. Even as a relator, I should have also paid the entrance... What a pity. Let us hope they will organise debates like those in Europe soon! My researches about Bob are several and, I think, very interesting.

Samu


Hi Samu,

That's were two in Europe in Autumn/Winter last year in Denmark and France. One of which was video-d and linked to from the ER main page.

There will be many more, doubtless.

Whether this is a good thing or not, I refer you to my article in ISIS 1xx, predicting this state of affairs.


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PostPosted: Wed March 20th, 2019, 16:15 GMT 

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gibsona07 wrote:
Bennyboy should pitch up across the street and hold his Alternative Bob Dylan Conference.


As Picard would say: "Make it so".

I'd speak there, too...


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PostPosted: Thu March 21st, 2019, 05:39 GMT 

Joined: Sat March 30th, 2013, 23:52 GMT
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Re: Samu

Cry us a river. Why even submit if the price of four days of programming($135 initially) was going to be an impossible burden? Did you expect to be paid?

Sorry if this seems too harsh, but everyone presenting doubtless has put tremendous thought and effort developing their topics. You know, pay for your ticket and don’t complain.


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PostPosted: Thu March 21st, 2019, 15:51 GMT 

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Roger McGuinn on June 1st:

https://dylan.utulsa.edu/byrds-founder- ... onference/


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PostPosted: Thu March 21st, 2019, 19:13 GMT 
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paid in blood wrote:
Re: Samu

Cry us a river. Why even submit if the price of four days of programming($135 initially) was going to be an impossible burden? Did you expect to be paid?

Sorry if this seems too harsh, but everyone presenting doubtless has put tremendous thought and effort developing their topics. You know, pay for your ticket and don’t complain.


If it had been for that, I would have gone without a doubt. £135 is a ridiculous price and that’s no problem for me in paying that. The problem is that I live in Italy and I am a student. The flights would have cost me a lot of money, and the conference hotel was also £101 per night. I did not want to be paid, of course, but I really hoped that the accommodation could be free for the people who discuss their papers. In the end, it would have been around £2000 and I did not accept the call, considering also the hard next months of study and work which I will face. My research is going on and I hope I will able to attend other conferences and to be selected for a PhD in Italy, Europe or United States. We will see...


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PostPosted: Thu March 21st, 2019, 19:20 GMT 
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Joined: Tue August 16th, 2011, 19:00 GMT
Posts: 274
Location: Emilia-Romagna, Italy
homerthes wrote:
samu_93 wrote:
My paper was selected but I could not accept the invitation because of the very high price. As of now, even though already graduated, I am still a university student, but I am an independent researcher and the costs were really expensive considering that I live and study in Italy. Even as a relator, I should have also paid the entrance... What a pity. Let us hope they will organise debates like those in Europe soon! My researches about Bob are several and, I think, very interesting.

Samu


Hi Samu,

That's were two in Europe in Autumn/Winter last year in Denmark and France. One of which was video-d and linked to from the ER main page.

There will be many more, doubtless.

Whether this is a good thing or not, I refer you to my article in ISIS 1xx, predicting this state of affairs.



Thank you very much, mate! I really hope I will be able to keep working on my research and present it at some conferences or win a PhD somewhere. I know about a significant conference happened last October in Rome. I could not attend and the lecturer were strictly professors or PhD students. During my university years, I studied Italian, Latin, and Greek literature, and nowadays I am still taking exams in Greek literature and history in order to obtain a certification for teaching Greek. My Dylan studies, however, have been progressing since I was in high school, around 2007/08. My master’s degree dealt with the relationship between Don DeLillo’s “Great Jones Street”, music - in particular Bob Dylan’s work - and African American culture. I have been working on a paper about Bob Dylan’s “Caribbean Wind” for years. Is it possible to read your article online?


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PostPosted: Thu March 21st, 2019, 23:22 GMT 
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Joined: Wed February 25th, 2009, 02:38 GMT
Posts: 366
Location: Champlin, MN
Still Go Barefoot wrote:
Debra Marquart, “Searching for Dylan in Fargo”


Interesting, would love to know what this is about, I only live a few hours from Fargo. I'm guessing Bobby Vee related?


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PostPosted: Fri March 22nd, 2019, 06:28 GMT 

Joined: Mon March 7th, 2011, 21:11 GMT
Posts: 904
Location: Outside the Gates of Eden
[QUOTE quote="homerthes"]
samu_93 wrote:
My paper was selected but I could not accept the invitation because of the very high price. As of now, even though already graduated, I am still a university student, but I am an independent researcher and the costs were really expensive considering that I live and study in Italy. Even as a relator, I should have also paid the entrance... What a pity. Let us hope they will organise debates like those in Europe soon! My researches about Bob are several and, I think, very interesting.

Samu


Hi Samu,

That's were two in Europe in Autumn/Winter last year in Denmark and France. One of which was video-d and linked to from the ER main page.

There will be many more, doubtless.

Whether this is a good thing or not, I refer you to my article in ISIS 1xx, predicting this state of affairs.[/quote]


Thank you very much, mate! I really hope I will be able to keep working on my research and present it at some conferences or win a PhD somewhere. I know about a significant conference happened last October in Rome. I could not attend and the lecturer were strictly professors or PhD students. During my university years, I studied Italian, Latin, and Greek literature, and nowadays I am still taking exams in Greek literature and history in order to obtain a certification for teaching Greek. My Dylan studies, however, have been progressing since I was in high school, around 2007/08. My master’s degree dealt with the relationship between Don DeLillo’s “Great Jones Street”, music - in particular Bob Dylan’s work - and African American culture. I have been working on a paper about Bob Dylan’s “Caribbean Wind” for years. Is it possible to read your article online?[/quote]


Ah, "Caribbean Wind", what a song. Or series of songs, finished or not.
Studying Greek literature must be handy with Dylan's ever widening use of classical sources.
I don't know if they are publishing the papers or videoing the conference. I will probably change mine radically now I have seen the program. In any case, I have a new book coming out at around the same time and that will cover everything I say and much more.


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PostPosted: Fri March 22nd, 2019, 10:58 GMT 
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Joined: Tue August 16th, 2011, 19:00 GMT
Posts: 274
Location: Emilia-Romagna, Italy
homerthes wrote:
[QUOTE quote="homerthes"]
samu_93 wrote:
My paper was selected but I could not accept the invitation because of the very high price. As of now, even though already graduated, I am still a university student, but I am an independent researcher and the costs were really expensive considering that I live and study in Italy. Even as a relator, I should have also paid the entrance... What a pity. Let us hope they will organise debates like those in Europe soon! My researches about Bob are several and, I think, very interesting.

Samu


Hi Samu,

That's were two in Europe in Autumn/Winter last year in Denmark and France. One of which was video-d and linked to from the ER main page.

There will be many more, doubtless.

Whether this is a good thing or not, I refer you to my article in ISIS 1xx, predicting this state of affairs.



Thank you very much, mate! I really hope I will be able to keep working on my research and present it at some conferences or win a PhD somewhere. I know about a significant conference happened last October in Rome. I could not attend and the lecturer were strictly professors or PhD students. During my university years, I studied Italian, Latin, and Greek literature, and nowadays I am still taking exams in Greek literature and history in order to obtain a certification for teaching Greek. My Dylan studies, however, have been progressing since I was in high school, around 2007/08. My master’s degree dealt with the relationship between Don DeLillo’s “Great Jones Street”, music - in particular Bob Dylan’s work - and African American culture. I have been working on a paper about Bob Dylan’s “Caribbean Wind” for years. Is it possible to read your article online?[/quote]


Ah, "Caribbean Wind", what a song. Or series of songs, finished or not.
Studying Greek literature must be handy with Dylan's ever widening use of classical sources.
I don't know if they are publishing the papers or videoing the conference. I will probably change mine radically now I have seen the program. In any case, I have a new book coming out at around the same time and that will cover everything I say and much more.[/quote]

Congratulations for your next book! I am really looking forward to reading it. You are going to Tulsa, then, and what paper will you present? I am hoping to widen or finish my research and try and contact every kind of scientific revue or whatever because I would like to see my paper published someday. My main focus, nowadays, is to keep widening my research and present the paper at some conference soon. Let us keep in contact also through email and/or Facebook, if you want.


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PostPosted: Fri March 22nd, 2019, 11:11 GMT 
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Joined: Fri July 15th, 2011, 02:23 GMT
Posts: 24121
homerthes wrote:

Good addition...

The Bob Dylan Center℠ welcomes Byrds founder Roger McGuinn to the World of Bob Dylan conference on Saturday, June 1 at 8 p.m.

McGuinn will share stories of his long and influential career, from the creation of folk-rock and his work with Bob Dylan to his acclaimed Folk Den Project* and triumphant, sold-out “Sweetheart of the Rodeo” tour with Chris Hillman and Marty Stuart.

https://dylan.utulsa.edu/byrds-founder- ... onference/


—-
*Folk Den is a folk music website founded in 1995 by Roger McGuinn, former front man of The Byrds. Hosted at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's ibiblio, the site is intended to preserve and promote folk music and offers a new folk song on a monthly basis. Each posting provides an MP3 of a traditional folk song along with a descriptive paragraph, lyrics, guitar chords and related images. The site has received positive reviews from The New York Times, the Discovery Channel, and CNET.

from: Wikipedia (so it must be true)


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