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PostPosted: Fri March 22nd, 2019, 13:55 GMT 
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homerthes wrote:
gibsona07 wrote:
Bennyboy should pitch up across the street and hold his Alternative Bob Dylan Conference.


As Picard would say: "Make it so".

I'd speak there, too...


Alternative Bob Dylans only, mate, sorry. We might need someone to play the spoons as a warm up though?


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PostPosted: Fri March 22nd, 2019, 17:26 GMT 

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[/quote]
Congratulations for your next book! I am really looking forward to reading it. You are going to Tulsa, then, and what paper will you present? I am hoping to widen or finish my research and try and contact every kind of scientific revue or whatever because I would like to see my paper published someday. My main focus, nowadays, is to keep widening my research and present the paper at some conference soon. Let us keep in contact also through email and/or Facebook, if you want.[/quote]

I am going htere, yes, it'll bne a paper on a few of the connections between Dylan and Shakespeare but just a few as you get such little time. you keep plugging away and it'll all come good one day. I'm hard to keep in touch with as the only time I am online nowadays is for work. I do have Facebook pages but they are for books and are left - like my Twitter account - moribund other than during an 8 week Shakespeare Summer Festival when th e page connected to that springs into life and shames me into occassionally updating my Dylan one.

There are occasional 9very) updates now and again though:

https://www.facebook.com/Bob-Dylan-Trou ... 406297989/

and there's always this:

http://www.a-muir.co.uk/

also left moribun as I've more or less retired into being Homer, the hermit


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PostPosted: Fri March 22nd, 2019, 17:32 GMT 

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McG wrote:

Alternative Bob Dylans only, mate, sorry. We might need someone to play the spoons as a warm up though?



I could apply for said position but we'll need some sort of recognition system as it has been so long since we met............... I can't play the spoons, btw, so it'd have to be a 1991 Spring tribute.


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PostPosted: Sat March 23rd, 2019, 13:30 GMT 
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homerthes wrote:

I am going htere, yes, it'll bne a paper on a few of the connections between Dylan and Shakespeare but just a few as you get such little time. you keep plugging away and it'll all come good one day. I'm hard to keep in touch with as the only time I am online nowadays is for work. I do have Facebook pages but they are for books and are left - like my Twitter account - moribund other than during an 8 week Shakespeare Summer Festival when th e page connected to that springs into life and shames me into occassionally updating my Dylan one.

There are occasional 9very) updates now and again though:

https://www.facebook.com/Bob-Dylan-Trou ... 406297989/

and there's always this:

http://www.a-muir.co.uk/

also left moribun as I've more or less retired into being Homer, the hermit


Go for the Muir, stay for the hot chicks.


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PostPosted: Sat March 23rd, 2019, 15:37 GMT 
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McG wrote:
Go for the Muir, stay for the hot chicks.


Hoping one of them will be the burnt-out hottie with the drunken seahag voice screaming "THANK YOU BOBBY!! THANK YOU BOBBY!!!" all over my old 1999 bootleg cds.


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PostPosted: Sat March 23rd, 2019, 16:09 GMT 

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McG wrote:
homerthes wrote:

I am going there, yes, it'll be a paper on a few of the connections between Dylan and Shakespeare but just a few as you get such little time.

You keep plugging away, Samu, and it'll all come good one day. I'm hard to keep in touch with as the only time I am online nowadays is for work. I do have Facebook pages but they are for books and are left - like my Twitter account - moribund other than during an 8 week Shakespeare Summer Festival when the page connected to that springs into life and shames me into occassionally updating my Dylan one.

There are occasional (very) updates now and again though:

https://www.facebook.com/Bob-Dylan-Trou ... 406297989/

and there's always this:

http://www.a-muir.co.uk/

also left moribund as I've more or less retired into being Homer, the hermit


Go for the Muir, stay for the hot chicks.


Lol. Apologies for all the typos. Phone typing is too much for my aged eyesight, I am afraid.


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PostPosted: Thu March 28th, 2019, 12:04 GMT 
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Perhaps one of the more tantalizing thoughts about the dates of this conference is the fact that Bob is not touring at the time. The minuscule possibility of a Bob appearance in Tulsa has similar odds to winning the lottery, i.e doubtful. Ridiculous odds, but still remotely possible? Ha ha.


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PostPosted: Thu March 28th, 2019, 17:05 GMT 
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Still Go Barefoot wrote:
Perhaps one of the more tantalizing thoughts about the dates of this conference is the fact that Bob is not touring at the time. The minuscule possibility of a Bob appearance in Tulsa has similar odds to winning the lottery, i.e doubtful. Ridiculous odds, but still remotely possible? Ha ha.


File under 'have a word with yourself you nutter'


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PostPosted: Thu March 28th, 2019, 20:25 GMT 
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McG wrote:
Still Go Barefoot wrote:
Perhaps one of the more tantalizing thoughts about the dates of this conference is the fact that Bob is not touring at the time. The minuscule possibility of a Bob appearance in Tulsa has similar odds to winning the lottery, i.e doubtful. Ridiculous odds, but still remotely possible? Ha ha.


File under 'have a word with yourself you nutter'


I would, but there’s no open file space left there!


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PostPosted: Mon April 8th, 2019, 02:14 GMT 
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Had anyone ever heard of Ann Powers before this?


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PostPosted: Mon April 8th, 2019, 21:59 GMT 

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i'll paypal anyone who sneaks in a recorder and captures any jwh or otherwise outtakes they may play for you ;)


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PostPosted: Tue April 9th, 2019, 12:23 GMT 
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Still Go Barefoot wrote:
Had anyone ever heard of Ann Powers before this?

Powers was the pop music critic for The New York Times for years, so, yes, I'd heard of her before. She's on the short list of music writers that I pay attention to, because her writing is superb. There are some passages in this piece on Dylan and Jonah Lehrer that I really like: https://www.npr.org/sections/therecord/2012/08/01/157736941/on-bob-dylan-and-jonah-lehrer-two-fabulists

Powers writes, "Dylan's been exposed — and happily exposed himself — as a semi-fictional character constructed from memories of Barnum's circus freaks, the caricatures of blackface minstrelsy and the ghost stories of the Wild West, as much as from 'higher' sources like Walt Whitman or the civil rights movement"

Powers ends her piece with this:

This is the essence of the popular arts in America: Be a magpie, take from everywhere, but assemble the scraps and shiny things you've lifted in ways that not only seem inventive, but really do make new meanings. Fabrication is elemental to this process — not fakery, exactly, but the careful construction of a series of masks through which the artist can not only speak for himself, but channel and transform the vast and complicated past that bears him or her forward.

Integrity arises in the process of solidifying your relationship to those sources. For a journalist like Lehrer, there's a code, and he clearly violated it. An artist like Dylan shows us a different way of operating: of using insight not to shore up a myth of originality, but to connect to all the tall tales and ghost stories that establish a culture's character, to walk through a dreamscape whose atmosphere sticks to us and makes us who we are.

Dylan himself described this process in a 1963 poem he wrote for his hero, another truth-telling, self-made character. "You need something to open up a new door / 
To show you something you seen before / 
But overlooked a hundred times or more," read the lines from "Last Thoughts on Woody Guthrie." In art, originality is never that original. But that doesn't make it less real.


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PostPosted: Thu April 25th, 2019, 12:19 GMT 
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Thanks for that info, Scott! I’m guessing you’ll be there.

Today’s ER front page shows this recent addition:


Bob Dylan: “From the Archive 1963 – 2001”
Posted about 2 weeks ago

The TU Institute for Bob Dylan Studies is excited to announce the final keynote for the World of Bob Dylan Symposium this Summer.

The Bob Dylan Center presents “Bob Dylan: From the Archive 1963 – 2001″ which will be screened May 31st at 8 PM as a Friday keynote event for the World of Bob Dylan Symposium.

The keynote will be an evening of rare, largely unseen, television and concert performances spanning forty years in Bob Dylan’s career. Culled from the Dylan Archive, this evening will include newly discovered and restored performances from Dylan’s 1966 tour of Europe, the 1975 Rolling Thunder Revue, 1986’s Hard to Handle tour with Tom Petty and much more. It will be hosted by Bob Dylan Archive curator Michael Chaiken.

The Runtime is 100 minutes. To learn more about The World of Bob Dylan, visit the event page here. To register, visit our registration page. To stay up-to-date on events and announcements, follow our Facebook page.


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PostPosted: Wed May 1st, 2019, 17:40 GMT 
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Might trade this experience for a nice boxed 75 set & perhaps a show?


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PostPosted: Wed May 1st, 2019, 22:05 GMT 
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yopietro wrote:
McG wrote:
I've submitted my paper, titled 'World Gone Wrong - Why Bob Dylan Not Painting His Masterpiece Is To Blame For Things Not Being Beautiful And Different'


It is all Bob's fault. His songwriting has a powerful quantum effect on the events in the world and his relinquishing of his duties has left us all for the worse.
Yeah, all I wanted to do was film the guy.


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PostPosted: Thu May 16th, 2019, 04:40 GMT 
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Bailed.


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PostPosted: Thu May 16th, 2019, 08:31 GMT 

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scottw wrote:
Still Go Barefoot wrote:
Had anyone ever heard of Ann Powers before this?

Powers was the pop music critic for The New York Times for years, so, yes, I'd heard of her before. She's on the short list of music writers that I pay attention to, because her writing is superb. There are some passages in this piece on Dylan and Jonah Lehrer that I really like: https://www.npr.org/sections/therecord/2012/08/01/157736941/on-bob-dylan-and-jonah-lehrer-two-fabulists

Powers writes, "Dylan's been exposed — and happily exposed himself — as a semi-fictional character constructed from memories of Barnum's circus freaks, the caricatures of blackface minstrelsy and the ghost stories of the Wild West, as much as from 'higher' sources like Walt Whitman or the civil rights movement"

Powers ends her piece with this:

This is the essence of the popular arts in America: Be a magpie, take from everywhere, but assemble the scraps and shiny things you've lifted in ways that not only seem inventive, but really do make new meanings. Fabrication is elemental to this process — not fakery, exactly, but the careful construction of a series of masks through which the artist can not only speak for himself, but channel and transform the vast and complicated past that bears him or her forward.

Integrity arises in the process of solidifying your relationship to those sources. For a journalist like Lehrer, there's a code, and he clearly violated it. An artist like Dylan shows us a different way of operating: of using insight not to shore up a myth of originality, but to connect to all the tall tales and ghost stories that establish a culture's character, to walk through a dreamscape whose atmosphere sticks to us and makes us who we are.

Dylan himself described this process in a 1963 poem he wrote for his hero, another truth-telling, self-made character. "You need something to open up a new door / 
To show you something you seen before / 
But overlooked a hundred times or more," read the lines from "Last Thoughts on Woody Guthrie." In art, originality is never that original. But that doesn't make it less real.


Anything truly original would not, could not, be real.


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PostPosted: Tue May 28th, 2019, 23:30 GMT 
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Registration Closed

Have fun everyone!

May 30 to June 3, 2019

Please share your thoughts about the Event, if you can.
Enjoy!


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PostPosted: Thu May 30th, 2019, 10:42 GMT 
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From today’s front page:

World of Bob Dylan' draws people
from around the world to Tulsa


by James D. Watts Jr. Tulsa World
May 29, 2019


The world of Bob Dylan is a great deal larger than Sean Latham first imagined.

This weekend, academic scholars, rock critics, music archivists, musicians, fans and all manner of Dylan experts and obsessives will come to Tulsa for the “World of Bob Dylan” symposium, presented by the University of Tulsa’s Institute for Bob Dylan Studies.

The four-day event will feature panel discussions, lectures, performances, exhibitions and other activities that will examine the life and work of one of the greatest artists this country has produced.

Events will be held at the Hyatt Regency hotel, 100 E. Second St.; Gilcrease Museum and the Helmerich Center for American Research, 1400 N. Gilcrease Museum Road, where the Bob Dylan Archives are currently housed; and the Greenwood Cultural Center, 322 N. Greenwood Ave.

It is the first event of its type to be presented on such a scale in this country, said Latham, director of the Institute of Bob Dylan Studies, which TU created after the George Kaiser Family Foundation purchased the Bob Dylan Archives.

“I don’t have the exact details,” he said, “but I think the last time something like this took place was about 20 years ago in the United Kingdom. But it’s definitely the first time there has been something on this scale taking place in the United States.

“When we started planning this, we estimated that we would have at most about 200 people attending,” Latham said. “We’re now up to 500 people registered, coming from all over the world to be a part of this symposium.”

“The World of Bob Dylan” will provide a deep dive into aspects of Bob Dylan’s work as a writer, performer, filmmaker, artist and public figure that range from in-depth examinations of individual songs and albums and how they came to be, to presentations that link Dylan to such concepts as that of the Trickster in Native American mythology. It will also examine how religious themes and imagery inform Dylan’s music beyond the three albums that make up his “born again” phase in the early 1980s, and the way he addressed concepts of social justice and politics in his songs.

While some of the titles of the planned presentations can sound a bit daunting to the layman — “Madness in Great Ones: In Which the Strange Parade of Street-Legal Radicalizes the Poetic Ideal of Negative Capability”; “Making the Conscious Unconscious: The Inversion of the Psychoanalytic Method in Bob Dylan’s Artistic Process” and “Heideggerian Insights into Bob Dylan’s ‘Up to Me’: Original Truths that the Artist Chose to Bury,” to name just three — Latham said the symposium isn’t a purely academic exercise.

“Because we essentially invented this thing out of whole cloth, it was something of a matter of planning and luck that we ended up with a good mix of academic and nonacademic presenters,” Latham said. “We wanted this to be as inclusive as possible because if there’s one thing we’ve learned, it’s that Bob Dylan and his music has about as universal an appeal as you can imagine.”

Two of the symposium’s keynote speakers are legendary rock critic Greil Marcus, a former writer for Rolling Stone magazine who has written several books on Dylan and his music; and Ann Powers, chief music critic for National Public Radio.
While registration is closed for the symposium, several events are open to the public.

The film “Bob Dylan: From the Archive 1963–2001” will be screened at 8 p.m. Friday, May 31, at the Hyatt Regency Hotel, as that day’s keynote event for the symposium, hosted by Bob Dylan Archive curator Michael Chaiken.

The film features rare, largely unseen television and concert performances drawn from the Bob Dylan Archives, spanning 40 years in Bob Dylan’s career, including newly discovered and restored performances from Dylan’s 1966 tour of Europe, the 1975 Rolling Thunder Revue and 1986’s Hard to Handle tour with Tom Petty.

Tickets for the film are $10, and may be reserved at eventbrite.com.

Roger McGuinn, co-founder of the seminal folk-rock band The Byrds, will discuss his career with music journalist Jeff Slate at 8 p.m. Saturday, June 1, at the Hyatt Regency.

The Byrds’ first single was a chart-topping version of Dylan’s “Mr. Tambourine Man,” a No. 1 hit, and over the next decade, McGuinn and The Byrds maintained a close personal and artistic relationship with Dylan, with McGuinn taking part in the legendary Rolling Thunder Revue tour.

McGuinn will share stories from his long and influential career, from the creation of folk-rock and his work with Dylan, to his acclaimed Folk Den Project and triumphant, sold-out “Sweetheart of the Rodeo” tour with fellow former Byrd Chris Hillman and country legend Marty Stuart.
Tickets are $20 and are available through eventbrite.com.

In addition, Gilcrease Museum has on display the exhibit “Bob Dylan: Face Value and Beyond,” the first regional showing of Dylan’s renowned Face Value portrait series and the debut of drawings, filmed performances, writings and personal effects exclusive to the Bob Dylan Archive collection; and Wisconsin-based visual artist Skye’s large-scale installation titled “Shakespeare’s in the Alley,” which features some of Dylan’s most-loved songs, reproduced on large banners hanging from the ceiling of the museum’s Helmerich Hall.

Some groups in Tulsa are also planning events to be held in conjunction with the symposium, such as the debut “Live at Cain’s” concert at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 29, at Cain’s Ballroom, 423 N. Main St. The event will feature nationally known performers Robbie Fulks and Bonnie Bishop, with Paul Benjaman, John Fullbright and the Oklahoma Specials. Tickets are $25-$40, available at cainsballroom.com.

“There’s even a Facebook page for people who are coming to the symposium, and they’re planning all sorts of things that have nothing to do with us,” Latham said. “It just shows the huge fan following Bob Dylan has.”

—-
Symposium
"The World of Bob Dylan"
May 30-June 2 at the Hyatt Regency Hotel, 100 E. Second St.; Gilcrease Museum, 1400 N. Gilcrease Museum Road; and Greenwood Cultural Center, 322 N. Greenwood Ave.
Registration closed, for more info see dylan.utulsa.edu

—-
Upcoming Bob Dylan events at Circle Cinema, 10 S. Lewis Ave.
Circle Cinema screening of "Rolling Thunder"
8 p.m. Tuesday, June 11
Tickets: $20
Special Premiere Screening of "Rolling Thunder Revue: A Bob Dylan Story" by Martin Scorsese. Presented with the Bob Dylan Center. Program includes film, a Q&A with author, songwriter and Rolling Thunder Revue veteran Larry “Ratso” Sloman.

Special Screening for Circle Cinema's Film Festival
"Masked and Anonymous" with Special Guest Larry Charles
6 p.m. Sunday, July 14, Circle Cinema
Tickets: $20 - CCFF badge discounts apply

Comedy legend Larry Charles jumped straight into the deep end with his directorial debut "Masked an Anonymous," a cinematic "meta-fiction" starring Bob Dylan that's part psychodrama, part meditation on the chaotic state of modern America.

Charles' other film and television credits include Seinfeld, Curb Your Enthusiasm, Borat and Religulous. His most recent series, Larry Charles' Dangerous World of Comedy, premiered in February on Netflix.

https://www.tulsaworld.com/entertainmen ... ssion=true


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PostPosted: Fri May 31st, 2019, 00:11 GMT 
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Since nobody seems to have reported in yet, a few observations from the first day.

- Greil was fantastic, spoke on Dylan and the Blues in the way only Greil can - weaving references and times and deep interesting thoughts on Bob
- Andrew Muir was fun and great, talking about Dylan and Shakespear and language

There are some cool collectibles, including conf t-shirts and a poster, and the Dylan Center has a different ltd edition shirt, plus coffee mugs from the About Face exhibit.

I'm sure others will post more, but we're live.... I have a great panorama picture of 500 Bobcats filling the auditorial just before Greil spoke. I'm sure will post somewhere...


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PostPosted: Fri May 31st, 2019, 12:38 GMT 
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dpam wrote:
Since nobody seems to have reported in yet, a few observations from the first day.

- Greil was fantastic, spoke on Dylan and the Blues in the way only Greil can - weaving references and times and deep interesting thoughts on Bob
- Andrew Muir was fun and great, talking about Dylan and Shakespear and language

There are some cool collectibles, including conf t-shirts and a poster, and the Dylan Center has a different ltd edition shirt, plus coffee mugs from the About Face exhibit.

I'm sure others will post more, but we're live.... I have a great panorama picture of 500 Bobcats filling the auditorial just before Greil spoke. I'm sure will post somewhere...


Thanks for the kickoff update, DPam!


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PostPosted: Fri May 31st, 2019, 12:41 GMT 
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dpam wrote:
Since nobody seems to have reported in yet, a few observations from the first day.

- Greil was fantastic, spoke on Dylan and the Blues in the way only Greil can - weaving references and times and deep interesting thoughts on Bob
- Andrew Muir was fun and great, talking about Dylan and Shakespear and language

There are some cool collectibles, including conf t-shirts and a poster, and the Dylan Center has a different ltd edition shirt, plus coffee mugs from the About Face exhibit.

I'm sure others will post more, but we're live.... I have a great panorama picture of 500 Bobcats filling the auditorial just before Greil spoke. I'm sure will post somewhere...


What about the hot chicks?


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PostPosted: Sat June 1st, 2019, 10:16 GMT 
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From a Reddit post. Not mine.

"Just heard some recordings never released to the public"

"At the Dylan conference in Tulsa. I obviously couldn’t record anything, but I heard some remarkable things, including Dylan recording Ready Teddy in 1958 while he was in high school and a couple John Wesley Harding outtakes (All Along the Watchtower and As I Went Out One Morning). More than anything I saw or heard, I was blown away by a haunting stripped down version of Love Sick. Guys, the Time Out of Mind outtakes are going to be unbelievable."


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PostPosted: Sat June 1st, 2019, 10:39 GMT 
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Viktor123 wrote:
Guys, the Time Out of Mind outtakes are going to be unbelievable.

My holy grail... :oops:


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PostPosted: Sat June 1st, 2019, 11:14 GMT 

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Session 7: From THE BOB DYLAN ARCHIVE COLLECTION 1963-2001

Michael Chaiken, Television & Concert Performances

Program (#1-13) are identical with the recent presentation at the Asbury Park Film Festival:

1. “North Country Blues” from 1963 Newport Folk Festival.
2. “Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall,” QUEST (CBC Broadcast), 1 February 1964.
3. “It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue,” (1966) (only complete film performance from that tour), very similar to Manchester show, but wearing checkered green/brown suit. Heavy on articulation and sibilance at the end of the lines. Drinks a glass of water immediately after concluding. This and the subsequent performance of “Baby Let Me Follow You Down” were thought lost but are part of a batch of film that has been discovered during the 2017 digitalization of film from the 1966 tour, in which all of the footage was rescanned for high definition preservation. In the process of doing that, 25% of the footage filmed at the time by Pennebaker and Alk was thought lost but was discovered and, of course, scanned.
4. “Baby Let Me Follow You Down” (1966) (this was complete), appeared from same show as above. I do not know why the notes from Bob Dylan Music that Michael Chaiken read indicated that “It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue” is the only complete performance filmed from the tour b/c this performance is also complete. In between verses, Dylan turns his back to the camera and faces Robbie Robertson, who takes his wild solos. Sometimes you can see Robertson’s right hand bending notes, sometimes you cannot b/c Dylan’s back blocks the view.
5. “Baby Let Me Follow You Down” (Last Waltz 1976).
6. “It Ain’t Me, Babe” from Harvard Square Theater in 1975 and is in the Rolling Thunder Revue: A Bob Dylan Story by Martin Scorsese. Identical from Renaldo & Clara, complete with brief shot of Ronee Blakely (not on stage) when Dylan sings “lover for your life and nothing more” and also the double exposure with Dylan and Bob Neuwirth double exposed with an upside down shot of the audience throwing balloons up in the air (at least that is what it looked like to me). It was great to see this performance in such good quality.
7. “Going Going Gone” from the Ft. Collins 1976 show. It was not broadcast as part of the Hard Rain broadcast. This is a never before seen performance. Some lines I transcribed: “I love you baby / And it’s plain to see / That’s it’s too rough a road / And it’s beginning to get to me.” “I’ve been sleeping in the rain / And I’m eating out of the dust / …. / Before it turns to rust.” “Don’t you and that love long dream ever part.” “I love you baby / “But you gotta understand / That you want to be free / So let go of my hand.” “Papa say son, don’t follow your heart…don’t you and that love long dream ever part.” “I’m still in love with you darling / But you got to understand / That you want to be free / So let go of my hand.” At the end some roadies are removing a cable in the background.
8. “What Can I Do For You?” from Toronto 1980. This was filmed during the April and May 1980 shows that appeared in the Trouble No More DVD.
9. “Shot of Love” shot by Howard Alk and filmed in 1981. From extras on DVD. Alk doesn’t really have access to a good shot of Dylan from the front, so he is mostly behind the musicians and shooting from the side. Lots of shots of the Queens of Rhythm.
10. “When the Night Comes Falling From the Sky,” 1986, Sydney. Part of the largest multi-cam concert shoot of the time, shot for Hard to Handle. The Dylan archive recently found all of the archive footage shot for Hard to Handle in an archive in Australia. It will soon be available at the Dylan Archive. I am pretty sure, “When the Night Comes Falling” is in the Hard to Handle concert film.
11. “Tight Connection to My Heart” (Supper Club 1993). First effort to film any of the Never Ending shows. This is directed by Michael Borovsky and an attempt to film four sets over two nights for MTV. It appears to have been shot with film and not video. As the song begins, there is a drop of sweat on Dylan’s nose that is backlit that appears like a distant star. It is either distracting or fascinating. As the song kicks into gear, Dylan hams it up while scanning through chords on the neck of his acoustic guitar. He is really vamping as he would during solos in the mid-1990s, but the camera inexplicably cuts to another musician just as Dylan begins. Go figure!
12. “Love & Theft” TV commercial from 2001.
13. “Cry Awhile” from 2002 Grammy Awards show.
Above is from Asbury Section of Program
Below was newly pulled by Chaiken for this evening's program:
14. “Hurricane” filmed by Howard Alk in 1975. First half is classic extreme Howard Alk close-ups of Dylan. The rest is a shot of Dylan from waist up with Scarlet Rivera in the background. No one other than Dylan or Rivera appear in this footage for any length of time. It is a terrific version. It is prefaced by a brief remark by Dylan about trying to get Hurricane out of prison. It was not identified as where the performance was from, although it will be easy to determine once the box set of CDs is released next week.
15. “You’re a Big Girl Now” from Hard Rain broadcast. This was terrific. It is the recording heard on the Hard Rain album. It began with a brief shot of Joan Baez sleeping or resing prone on a couple chairs back stage. Dylan points and smiles at the camera toward the beginning, perhaps acknowledging the cameraman (Alk?). There is a mandolin playing, but David Mansfield and mandolin are nowhere to be seen. Dylan is playing an electric guitar.


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